Archive for the ‘Blind Blake’ Category

Authors: Alex van der Tuuk, Bob Eagle, Rob Ford, Eric LeBlanc and Angela Mack

Source: www.bluesandrhythm.co.uk/documents/BR263-Blind-Blake.pdf

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“It is interesting to observe that the New York Recording Laboratories recorded and issued a relatively large group of blind musicians for their ‘race’ series, the Paramount 12000 and 13000 series. One would only have to think of blues artists
like Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Arthur Blake, Blind Willie Davis, Blind Roosevelt Graves and Blind Joel Taggart to name some of the most important exponents.”

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http://www.bluesandrhythm.co.uk/

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Authors: Gayle Dean Wardlow and Joel Slotnikoff

Source: http://www.bluesworld.com/Blake.htm

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“Around 1960, Riverside Records issued one of the first country blues albums, a tribute to Blind Blake. In the notes to the album, the writer identified Blake’s real name as Arthur Phelps, but gave no source for that last name. Obviously, the Riverside producers had not heard a copy of Paramount 12911, by Papa Charlie Jackson and Blind Blake, “Papa Charlie and Blind Blake Talk About It – Part 1,” on which Papa Charlie asks Blake, “Blake, What is yo’re right name?”
Without hesitating, Blake retorted, “My right name is Arthur Blake.” That should have ended any controversy about Blake’s last name, but it didn’t. No record was ever issued under the name of Blind Arthur Phelps, even the Broadways were issued under the name Blind George Martin. Later the name Phelps was traced to a comment made by Blind Willie McTell in a 1951 Melody Maker article written by Ed Paterson. That lone comment by McTell continued to be used into the 1970s by various writers as a source for the Phelps name for Blake before falling into disuse.”

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Author : Jas Obrecht

Source : http://jasobrecht.com/blind-blake-king-of-ragtime-blues/

 

 

 

 

 

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“During the mid 1920s, strong sales of 78s by Papa Charlie Jackson and Blind Lemon Jefferson led Paramount Records to sign Blind Blake, a swinging, sophisticated guitarist whose warm, relaxed voice was a far cry from harsh country blues. Some of Blake’s 78s cast him as a jivey hipster sitting in with jazzmen, while on others he walked the long, lonely road to the gallows. The man with the “famous piano-sounding guitar” is still regarded as the unrivaled master of ragtime blues fingerpicking.”

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