Archive for the ‘The Guitar’ Category

Author: Jas Obrecht.

Source: http://jasobrecht.com/blues-origins-spanish-fandango-and-sebastopol/

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“How did fanciful European parlor music influence the creation of the blues? In a more profound way than most fans realize. What follows is one of the most fascinating and least understood chapters in blues history.”

Read it HERE

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Author : Steven Errede

Source : Paper, Dpt of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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The history of the development of electric stringed musical instruments – in particular, the electric guitar and the electric bass is a fascinating one. It is a story of the interplay between man’s discovery of the basic, fundamental laws of physics and new physical phenomena and the creative, constructive synthesis and assimilation of this new knowledge into our culture for the enhancement and evolution of our cultures’ music, taking it in completely new directions.  The development of the electric guitar obviously occurred from the collective desire of musicians to electrify (and thereby amplify) the sound of their guitar, in order to better match the intrinsic volume levels of other instruments often used in bands. The historical
path of how this occurred is a very interesting story!
Hawaiian music was initially introduced into America by U.S. servicemen returning from overseas tours of duty in the Hawaiian islands, in the aftermath the Spanish-American war (April 21-August 12, 1898), in which Cuba was liberated from Spanish rule, Puerto Rico and Guam were ceded by Spain to the United States, the Philippines were sold to the U.S. for $20M, and the Hawaiian Islands were formally annexed by a resolution on July 7, 1998 from then-President William McKinley, which was rapidly approved by the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate, with a transfer of sovereignty on August 14, 1898. American sailors, while stationed in Hawaii, upon hearing Hawaiian music, were completely enamored with it. Some of them also learned how to play it, and thus brought Hawaiian music back to the U.S. with them when they returned. Hawaiian music rapidly became extremely popular amongst the American public, at the turn of the 20th century.

CONTINUE READING HERE

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A brief History of the Guitar

Posted: October 25, 2011 in Paul Guy, The Guitar

Author : Paul Guy

Source : http://www.guyguitars.com/eng/handbook/BriefHistory.html

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The guitar is an ancient and noble instrument, whose history can be traced back over 4000 years. Many theories have been advanced about the instrument’s ancestry. It has often been claimed that the guitar is a development of the lute, or even of the ancient Greek kithara. Research done by Dr. Michael Kasha in the 1960’s showed these claims to be without merit. He showed that the lute is a result of a separate line of development, sharing common ancestors with the guitar, but having had no influence on its evolution. The influence in the opposite direction is undeniable, however – the guitar’s immediate forefathers were a major influence on the development of the fretted lute from the fretless oud which the Moors brought with them to to Spain.

The sole “evidence” for the kithara theory is the similarity between the greek word “kithara” and the Spanish word “quitarra”. It is hard to imagine how the guitar could have evolved from the kithara, which was a completely different type of instrument – namely a square-framed lap harp, or “lyre”. (Right)

It would also be passing strange if a square-framed seven-string lap harp had given its name to the early Spanish 4-string “quitarra”. Dr. Kasha turns the question around and asks where the Greeks got the name “kithara”, and points out that the earliest Greek kitharas had only 4 strings when they were introduced from abroad. He surmises that the Greeks hellenified the old Persian name for a 4-stringed instrument, “chartar”.”

CONTINUE READING HERE

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