Archive for the ‘Jazz’ Category

Author: Jon Ozment

Source: http://www.jonozment.com

_________________________________________________

“It is common knowledge that the blues was one of the major components of jazz from the beginning. However, ragtime was the other major component, though its contribution is less appreciated. Increasing our understanding of the origins of jazz and the contributions of early jazz artists requires detailed study of all aspects of the relevant context. This paper endeavors to illuminate an important area of the historical and musical context by identifying and analyzing the formal elements of early jazz performances, thereby uncovering the extent to which ragtime contributed to the creation of jazz. Perceiving the influence of earlier styles helps us to appreciate the richness of jazz and acknowledge its true place in the panoply of American musical traditions.”

READ THE ESSAY HERE

Author: Karl Gert zur Heide

Source: Doctor Jazz Magazine 205, June 2009

(http://www.doctorjazz.nl/data/data/djm205.html)

_______________________________________________________

« For a blues fan, Cow Cow Davenport is a household name, and his « Cow Cow Blues » is a blues classic. Like jazz icon Jelly Roll Morton (1890-1941), Davenport (1894/95-1955) came from the Deep South of the USA, worked as a comedian, sang and played piano, composed songs and instrumentals, entertained in brothels, and was associated with women who could also sing the blues. Both men made some of their best recordings by cutting piano rolls for the Vocalstyle company in Cincinnati – Morton in 1924, Davenport in 1925/1926.
Besides their association with “the life” (in red-light districts), they shared another habit: crisscrossing the country and the barrelhouse circuit and with vaudeville acts and minstrel shows. This essay will throw more light on the tent-show aspect of Davenport’s career.”

CONTINUE READING HERE

Shining Trumpets

Posted: July 24, 2012 in History, Jazz, Rudi Blesh

Author: Rudi Blesh
Source: http://archive.org/details/shiningtrumpetsa011141mbp

__________________________________________

Rudi Blesh (1899- 1985), an American jazz critic and enthusiast held jobs writing jazz reviews for the San Francisco Chronicle and the New York Herald Tribune in the 1940s. He was a prolific promoter of jazz concerts, particularly New Orleans jazz, and hosted a jazz radio program, This Is Jazz, in 1947.

He published the first major scholarly work on ragtime music, They All Played Ragtime, with Harriet Janis in 1950, which sparked a ragtime revival. He founded Circle Records in 1946, which recorded new material from aging early jazz musicians as well as the Library of Congress recordings of Jelly Roll Morton.

Blesh held professorships at several universities later in his life, and wrote liner notes to jazz albums almost up until the time of his death.

He also wrote ”Shining Trumpets,” a scholarly history of Afro-American music. This work can be read HERE

_______________________________________________

Author: Frank Youngwerth

Source: http://delmark.com/rhythm.htm

_______________________________________________________

“It’s not exactly news anymore if a hip-hop group samples an old jazz record, but I was still pretty stunned to hear the Creators, a British production collective, cutting up the haunting, chime-laden intro to Joe “King” Oliver’s “St. James Infirmary” on a track released last year called “The Music.” The original Victor 1930 recording, something of a hit in its day, had been my own introduction to the legendary New Orleans cornetist’s music thirty-odd years ago; yet ever since, it’s rarely been heard or reissued in this country.

And not without reason, for it belongs to a group of recordings that every so often embarrasses the jazz anthology compiler or disc jockey who unsuspectingly draws from it–it’s a King Oliver-fronted record that doesn’t feature Oliver. Not one, but two other fine trumpeters, ex-Ellingtonian Bubber Miley and Henry “Red” Allen, take solos on “St. James Infirmary,” with Oliver thought merely to be playing lead on the last chorus.”
CONTINUE READING HERE

_______________________________________________________

Author: John Szwed
Source: www.jazzstudiesonline.org/files/DoctorJazz.pdf

________________________________________________________

“Jelly Roll Morton’s life had all the makings of tragedy: born shortly after the chaos of Reconstruction in the racially ambiguous Creole community of New Orleans, he turned against the wishes of his family and crossed class and racial lines to become a leading pianist in Storyville, the sporting district of New Orleans that provided the laboratory for the generation of musicians who invented jazz. But being a piano player, acclaim escaped him because trumpeters and clarinetists, and not pianists, were the recognized stars of early jazz, and it took years for his importance as a composer and bandleader to be appreciated. Then came what the fans of early jazz would later regard as the Fall: the closing of the district by the U.S. government, and the music Morton had helped create scattered across the earth, taken up by the forces of commerce, diluted and refined. Worse yet, Morton had the bad fortune to record his finest work in the mid- to late 1920’s, when the fashion in music was turning away from the complex, multi-thematic forms Jelly originated to embrace the much simpler 32 bar, AABA popular songs that the popular younger musicians like Louis Armstrong were playing and singing. Morton resisted this trend for as long as he could, but it cost him an audience and dated him prematurely. Finally, just when a revival of New Orleans music was underway in the early 1940’s and Morton was being rediscovered, death deprived him
of a second chance at fame.”

CONTINUE READING HERE

___________________________________________________________

Author: Courtney Patterson Carney

Source: A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of the Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in The Department of History, B.A., Baylor University, 1996 – M.A., Louisiana State University, 1998
December 2003

________________________________________________________

“In the early twentieth century jazz was a regionally based, racially defined dance music that featured solo and collective improvisation. Originating in New Orleans, jazz soon spread throughout the country as musicians left the South for better opportunities— both economic and social—elsewhere in the country. Jazz greatly increased in popularity during the 1920s. No longer a regional music dominated by African Americans, jazz in the 1920s helped define a generation torn between the Victorian society of nineteenth century America and the culture of modernity that was quickly defining the early twentieth century. Jazz and its eventual popularity represented the cultural tensions present in modern America, and the acceptance of jazz reflected the degree to which Americans rejected or accepted traditional values.

This dissertation examines the historical context of this larger transformation America underwent in the 1920s and early 1930s.”

CONTINUE READING HERE

________________________________________________________

Author: Paul Fritz Laubenstein
Source: The Musical Quarterly, Vol. 16, No. 3. (Jul., 1930), pp. 378-403

______________________________________________________

If you are in the mood for some historical reading which concludes a.o. that “Jazz and Blues reveal the bankruptcy of the Negro’s music divorced as they are from religion”, then start reading HERE

______________________________________________________