Archive for the ‘New Orleans’ Category

Authors: Lynn Abbott and Jack Stewart
Source: The Jazz Archivist, Vol. IX, 2, December 1994

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A most detailed description of the activities in the New Orleans black Iroquois vaudeville theater, which lets us have a very good idea of the creativity involved in the general black vaudeville theater life in the 1910’s.

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Author: Ted Widmer
Source: REVUE FRANÇAISE D’ÉTUDES AMÉRICAINES, N° 98 DECEMBER 2003
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“Was Congo Square—now Armstrong Park—in New Orleans, the birth place of jazz music? Very little reliable historical information is available about the place but what we know for certain is that three men, one musician and two journalists, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, George Washington Cable, and Lafcadio Hearn, did construct Congo Square as the starting point of Black music over the course of the nineteenth century. After 1885, Congo Square could be considered as an established part of New Orleans folklore.
Gradually the music that started there came to be identified as a central part of American identity.”

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Author: Matt Sakakeeny

Source: Black Music Research Journal Vol. 31, No. 2, Fall 2011; Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois

(Published by: Center for Black Music Research – Columbia College Chicago and University of Illinois Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/blacmusiresej.31.2.0291)

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“This essay provides a roughly chronological history of a single musical tradition in New Orleans, the brass band parade, as a case study that supports a more expansive proposition. The first half of this proposition is specific to New Orleans: I note that the city has become largely identified with African American musical practices and repertoires and, further, that the
associations between music, race, and place can be adequately subsumed under the categorical term New Orleans Music. While New Orleans Music includes an amorphous collection of interrelated styles—brass band, jazz, blues, rhythm & blues, soul, and funk, to name the most prevalent—they are bound together through an association with race (African American),
place (New Orleans), and functionality (social dance) to such a degree that even a disaster of immeasurable consequences, which disproportionately affected that race and dislocated them from that place, has not threatened its cohesiveness. The consensus about the overall attributes of New Orleans Music is so pervasive that naming them as such seems redundant.”

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