Archive for the ‘Piedmont’ Category

Author: Ray Harmon
Source: http://delmark.com/rhythm.estes.htm

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“The year was 1961. A lot was about to happen in the world. We see Jack Kennedy on the horizon, burning his way toward supernova in his desire to change America. American pop music stood primed and ready to mainline the uncut condensation of British youth. Freedom of expression was soon to get a 1st amendment hotshot of its own. Everything that is Western culture was about to implode as the decade of the sixties gathered steam on its trip into history.

In Brownsville Tennessee (pop. 4711), a quiet hamlet on the way through a beautiful and poor rural countryside some 60 miles east of Memphis, filmmaker David Blumenthal, who was in the area shooting a documentary on black migration to the North, stumbled upon an old man that he believed to be a forgotten legend of American folk blues.”

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Author: Roi Geyari

Source: http://paramountshome.org/Spotlight.htm

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“Nehemiah Curtis James was born on June 21, 1902 according to most sources, although some sources suggest that he was born on June 9 of the same year. He was born in Bentonia, a small town in Yazoo County, Mississippi.
Not much is known about the early years of his life. He got the nickname “Skip” or “Skippy” from his friends when he was very young. There are a few speculations of why he got that name. Whether it was because of his strange walking, or maybe because of the fact that he never stayed anywhere for long and often “skipped” from place to place, nobody is quite sure. One thing is certain. He didn’t realize at that time that the name “Skip James” will become one of the most legendary and recognizable names in blues history.”

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Author: Jas Obrecht

Source: http://jasobrecht.com/blind-boy-fuller-life-recording-sessions-welfare-records/

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“Decades ago, a fellow blues enthusiast sent me a package of official papers related to the life of Fulton Allen, who recorded as Blind Boy Fuller. Written during the 1930s by government officials, social workers, and physicians, these documents offer unique insight into the life of a legendary Southern bluesman. The stories they tell of poverty, ill health, and unhappiness with management and record companies are as blues-inducing as Blind Boy Fuller’s darkest recordings. To ensure their accuracy, all of the quotations in my account retain the parlance and punctuation of the original documents.

First, a few words about Fulton Allen. This extraordinarily prolific blues artist produced 130 Blind Boy Fuller records between 1935 and 1940, with songs coming out on the Vocalion, Conqueror, Perfect, Melotone, Columbia, OKeh, and Decca labels. Drawing on country blues, pop, and especially ragtime, Allen played fingerstyle and slide on a metal-bodied National Duolian guitar, sometimes using a capo. He sang with a strong, confident voice. His music came to epitomize the so-called Piedmont style, and his duets with harmonica ace Sonny Terry set the template for the later partnerships of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, Bowling Green John Cephas and Harmonica Phil Wiggins, and others.”

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